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course descriptions

ACT/SAT Prep Course

The purpose of the ACT/SAT Prep Course is to assist students in preparing to take the ACT/SAT test. This program will provide an overview of the test, practical test taking strategies and an opportunity to complete a simulated full-length ACT test.  This course is most specifically designed to help students be familiar with the ACT/SAT test. It is NOT an academic tutoring opportunity. Students will explore questions styles and samples for all four areas of the ACT test (reading, English, math and science). Other skills/strategies that will be addressed will include: what does the real test look like, how to take a timed test, how to approach questions that you don't know the answer, how to organize and write an essay in 30 minutes, how to maximize what you know, and other test taking strategies.

 

Bible


The task of teaching Bible is not taken lightly and it is the role of each educator at LCS to portray God in his/her character as not only an educator but as a child of God.  Just as Jesus grew in wisdom and in stature and in favor with God and men; our task is to work alongside parents and to re-enforce the teaching in God’s Word.  The Bible is the foundation to teaching as David himself said it is more precious than gold, sweeter than honey, than honey from the comb (Psalm 19:9,10).

In the first semester students will engage in a study of Christian Worldview.  What is it like being a Christian in a secular, post- Christian culture? We will ask the questions:  Is the Bible current? What is Theology? How do you make Bible applications to our own lives?  We will view segments of society that not only impacts our world but our Christian walk with God. This study will view ethics, laws, rules, unwritten norms, and how they are developed and established.  An additional study of Sociology and its application will include the function of the 3 institutions established by God:  Family, Church, and State.

In the second semester students will engage in an in-depth study of the Gospel of John, I, II, III John.  John is written in a narrative form that allows an in-depth study with application to individual student growth.  We will also include a study of the first three chapters in the book of Revelation.

Credit:  1 Unit

These commandments that I give you today are to be upon your hearts.  Impress them on your children.  Talk about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up.  Tie them as symbols on your hands and bind them on your foreheads.    Deuteronomy 6:6-8

 


Just as Jesus grew in wisdom and in stature and in favor with God and men; our task is to work alongside parents and to re-enforce the teaching in God’s Word.  The Bible is the foundation to teaching as David himself said it is more precious than gold, sweeter than honey, than honey from the comb  (Psalm 19:9,10).

Students will understand the relevance and application of our Church History to today’s circumstances.

In the first semester students will be in an in-depth study of Genesis, Exodus, Numbers, Joshua, Judges, I & II Samuel, Solomon (Ecclesiastes, Proverbs, Song of Solomon), Esther and Daniel  as a backdrop of understanding the focus of the New Testament and the establishment of the Church.

In the second semester students will focus on the life of Paul – Introduction in Acts and a study of Paul’s books with a special focus on Galatians and Romans.  Paul helps in bridging the gap of the Old Testament to the New Testament Christian.

Credit:  1 Unit

These commandments that I give you today are to be upon your hearts.  Impress them on your children.  Talk about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up.  Tie them as symbols on your hands and bind them on your foreheads.    Deuteronomy 6:6-8


The Bible is the foundation to teaching as David himself said it is more precious than gold, sweeter than honey, than honey from the comb (Psalm 19:9, 10).   The task of teaching Bible is not taken lightly and it is the role of each educator at LCS to portray God in his/her character as not only an educator but a child of God. 

The first semester students will study key figures throughout history; learn about different denominations, differing views of doctrines.  Critical thinking applied to past issues in the church help us understand successes and mistakes and a direction for the future.  Study will begin in the book of Acts and develop through two centuries of history. What did the early church look like?  View oral tradition, persecution, Catholicism, Calvinism, Islam and the Holy Wars, Dark Ages and Crusades.  We will look at key figures in Church History: Reformation and Restoration Eras such as Luther, Calvin, Wesley, Stone and Campbell, etc….

In the second semester students will focus on the study and application of Church History to help interpret Scripture for the present time.  This will include an in-depth study of Ephesians, Philemon, and I Corinthians, and the influence of Paul upon belief patterns throughout Church History through today’s Christian thought.

Credit: 1 Unit

These commandments that I give you today are to be upon your hearts.  Impress them on your children.  Talk about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up.  Tie them as symbols on your hands and bind them on your foreheads.    Deuteronomy 6:6-8

 

ELA (English/Language Arts)


Summer reading will be required for this course.

English I will include a faster pace of reading a wide variety of world literary and informational texts; writing a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; researching to locate a range of relevant sources and present ideas and information; listening and speaking; using oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing; and building vocabulary consistent with the ACT exam.

In English I, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills.

While English I is academically rigorous, each text allows for growth and discussion of spiritual principles utilizing a Christian world view.  Students should read and write on a daily basis.  Students in this class will be required to work independently outside of class on reading and writing assignments.

Prerequisite:  Summer reading and 8th grade English

Credit:  1 Unit

Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward.  It is the Lord Christ you are serving.   Colossians 3:23-24

 


Summer reading will be required for this course.

In this class, students will read a wide variety of world literary and informational texts; writing a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; researching to locate a range of relevant sources and present ideas and information; listening and speaking; using oral and written conversations of the English language in speaking and writing; and building vocabulary consistent with the ACT exam.

In English II, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills.

While English II is academically rigorous, each text allows for growth and discussion of spiritual principles utilizing a Christian world view.  Students should read and write on a daily basis.  Students in this class will be required to work independently outside of class on reading and writing assignments.

Prerequisite:  Summer reading and English I

Credit:  1 Unit

Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward.  It is the Lord Christ you are serving.   Colossians 3:23-24

 


Summer reading will be required for this course.

This course will include reading a wide variety of literary and informational texts, with a focus on American Literature; writing a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; researching to locate a range of relevant sources and present ideas and information; listening and speaking; using oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing; and continue building vocabulary consistent with the expected rigors of college work.

In English III, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills.

While English III is academically rigorous, each text allows for growth and discussion of spiritual principles utilizing a Christian world view.  Students should read and write on a daily basis.  Students in this class will be required to work independently outside of class on reading and writing assignments.

Prerequisite:  Summer reading and English II

Credit:  1 Unit

Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward.  It is the Lord Christ you are serving.   Colossians 3:23-24


Summer reading will be required for this course.

This course will include reading a wide variety of literary and informational texts, with a focus on British Literature; writing a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; researching to locate a range of relevant sources and present ideas and information; listening and speaking; using oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing; and continue building vocabulary consistent with the expected rigors of college work.

In English IV, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills.

While English IV is academically rigorous, each text allows for growth and discussion of spiritual principles utilizing a Christian world view.  Students should read and write on a daily basis.  Students in this class will be required to work independently outside of class on reading and writing assignments.

Prerequisite:  Summer reading and English III

Credit:  1 Unit

Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward.  It is the Lord Christ you are serving.   Colossians 3:23-24

Fine Arts

Much like Junior High Art I, High School Art I is an introduction to the fine arts.  This course is designed both for the student who plans to continue in advanced high school art classes, and those who wish to receive fine art credit.

In this introductory course to the visual arts, students will explore the talents and abilities which God has blessed them with. This is done so through a variety of concepts and drawing media, painting, 3D design, techniques in perspective, and much more. The student will create original, imaginative works of art in drawing, painting, ceramics and sculpture that demonstrate knowledge of the elements and principles of art. Traditionally First semester focuses mostly on 2D while the spring semester focuses on 3D works.

Many student projects are displayed, outside the art classroom, at various art expositions throughout the community, and may be entered in competitions; such as the South Plains Art Fair, Mentor/Tormentor Exhibit at LCU, Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, Wayland Baptist University in Plainview, The ArtEffect project, Visual Arts Scholastic Event, Lubbock Arts Festival, TAPPS, and TCSIT.

Students are entered into competitions in an effort to further their appreciation of Art, instill a sense of accomplishment both for themselves and their work, and ultimately to give students a chance to let God’s light shine through their efforts and everything they do.

Prerequisite: None

Credit: 1 Unit

You are the light of the world.  A city on a hill cannot be hidden.  Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl.  Instead, they put it on a stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house.  In the same way, let your light shine before men, that they may see your good deeds and praise your Father in heaven.    Matthew 5:14-16

This course is designed for the student who plans to continue in advanced high school art classes and will aid in selecting a desired Medium of choice for Art III/IV.

Students are provided with the opportunity to further explore Drawing, Painting, Photography, and Ceramics. Typically, they will be provided with a prompt to critically think about, work with, and then decide which medium to utilize. However, the medium will sometimes be assigned at the teachers’ discretion.

This course will allow students to further develop fundamental drawing skills through the creation of  original two-dimensional works of art with diverse drawing media. Students will also create original two-dimensional works of arts with diverse Painting media not utilized in Art I, such as oils, and water-color. Students will also explore Photography by a digital camera. They will look at the world around them which God created, learn to create good composition, use the features of a digital camera, and understand how to use photography in mixed media designs. Students are provided with the opportunity to create both two-dimensional and three-dimensional photographic artwork. Should a student choose to further explore photography they may use their own digital camera or split time with other students using cameras provided by LCHS. Should a student choose to go the Ceramic route they will explore the possibilities of clay as an art medium. This includes the choice of hand building, wheel throwing, glazing, firing techniques, and presentation skills of both functional and nonfunctional works of art to be chosen by the student. Overall students will also receive experience with some printmaking mediums as well as methods for analyzing art.

This course requires elaboration on personal visual problem solving and knowledge of the elements of art. In regard to ceramics emphasis will be on developing the students’ conceptual and problem solving skills while still improving on technical skills. Many student projects are displayed, outside the art classroom, at various art expositions throughout the community, and may be entered in competitions; such as the South Plains Art Fair, Mentor/Tormentor Exhibit at LCU, Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, Wayland Baptist University in Plainview, The ArtEffect project, Visual Arts Scholastic Event, Lubbock Arts Festival, TAPPS, and TCSIT.

Prerequisite: High School Art I

Credit: 1 Unit

You are the light of the world.  A city on a hill cannot be hidden.  Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl.  Instead, they put it on a stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house.  In the same way, let your light shine before men, that they may see your good deeds and praise your Father in heaven.    Matthew 5:14-16

This course is designed for the student who intends to continue in advanced high school art classes Students are encouraged to select a preferred medium from Art II however are still provided with the opportunity to further explore all mediums of art. Students are also asked to begin thinking further about concept development and what subject matter they may want to focus on in ART IV.

Students are provided with the opportunity to further explore Drawing, Painting, Photography, and Ceramics. Like with Art II typically the student will be provided with a prompt to critically think about, work with, and then decide which medium to utilize. However, the medium will sometimes be assigned at the teachers’ discretion. Students are expected to start developing their own artistic visions, explain their artistic choices, and adequately defend said choices.

In regard to drawing this course is an extension of the drawing fundamentals introduced in Drawing II. Students will continue an exploration of diverse media while concentrating on themes and visual motifs. Drawing projects are lengthy and thorough and require a working knowledge of drawing fundamentals as well as the principles of art. With regard to Painting this course extends the study, application and utilization of the elements and principles of art. Students will incorporate advanced color theory, various modes of design, and comprehensive art critiques in order to find their individual voice and personal style. Emphasis is placed on maintaining a working portfolio which will serve to enhance their success in Art IV and TAPPS/TCSIT competitions. Photography builds on concepts learned in the Photography I portion of ART II and gives students freedom to pursue photography in various ways as a form of artistic self-expression. Should a student choose to go the Ceramic route they will explore the possibilities of clay as an art medium. This includes the choice of hand building, wheel throwing, glazing, firing techniques, and presentation skills of both functional and nonfunctional works of art to be chosen by the student.

Students will pursue artistic perception, creative expression, historical and cultural context, and career exploration. Overall students will also receive experience with some printmaking mediums as well as methods for analyzing art. They will discover how to explore talents God has blessed them with and utilize said talents to bless their work and the surrounding community. Many student projects are displayed, outside the art classroom, at various art expositions throughout the community, and may be entered in competitions; such as the South Plains Art Fair, Mentor/Tormentor Exhibit at LCU, Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, Wayland Baptist University in Plainview, The ArtEffect project, Visual Arts Scholastic Event, Lubbock Arts Festival, TAPPS, and TCSIT.

Prerequisite: High School Art I & II

Credit: 1 Unit

You are the light of the world.  A city on a hill cannot be hidden.  Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl.  Instead they put it on a stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house.  In the same way, let your light shine before men, that they may see your good deeds and praise your Father in heaven.    Matthew 5:14-16


High School Band has a great tradition of success and service to the community.  Our emphasis is to realize that music is a gift from God, and we are blessed with the abilities to make, understand, and enjoy this gift He has created for us.

Our program is based on developing young musicians to make great music, enjoy music, and understand the importance of music in our society.

Students are able to participate in solos, ensembles, jazz band, and concert band.  During football season we have marching band.  During basketball season we have made appearances with a smaller pep band.

The band serves the school at pep rallies and games, but they also serve the community with various activities including our flag route around the LCS neighborhood.

Prerequisite:  Teacher Recommendation

Credit:  1 Unit

You are the light of the world.  A city on a hill cannot be hidden.  Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl.  Instead they put it on a stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house.  In the same way, let your light shine before men, that they may see your good deeds and praise your Father in heaven.    Matthew 5:14-16

Foreign Language

Spanish I and II courses are thoroughly integrated with biblical worldview text, readings, activities, and cultural sections. Students will be continually reminded that studying Spanish is one of the many ways that they can fulfill the biblical mandate to love God and others. Students will develop their ability to think critically from a biblical perspective on cultural issues in the Hispanic world not only regarding important events in history, but also with regard to the products, practices, and perspectives of those cultures.

Spanish I

Prerequisite:  None

Credit: 1 Unit

 

Spanish II

Prerequisite:  Spanish I

Credit: 1 Unit

But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control.     Galations 5:22-23

Math


This course will include simplifying, evaluating, and solving simple basic algebraic expressions and equations.  Students will use symbols in a variety of ways to study relationships among quantities.

A function is a mathematical concept; it expresses a special kind of relationship between two quantities.  Students will use functions to determine one quantity from another, to represent and model problem situations, and to analyze and interpret relationships.

Inequalities will be addressed considering things are not always equal.  Solving and graphing of these inequalities are expected along with life applications of these areas.  Toward the end of the year, there is an introduction to exponents which gives the students a glimpse of quadratic functions which is discussed at length in Algebra II. Algebra I specifically deals with how to solve a quadratic equation and what that means on a graph and in the real world.

8th Grade

Prerequisite:  Teacher recommendation

Credit:  1 Unit

 

9th Grade

Prerequisite: None

Credit: 1 Unit

Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward.  It is the Lord Christ you are serving.   Colossians 3:23-24


In this class, students spend the first part of the year reviewing all of the concepts of lines and linear functions, which includes finding all aspects of a line (slope, intercepts, and graphs).  This is accomplished with one line then move to more than one line, which is known as systems.  All the different methods of solving systems is explored and related to different real-life applications and knowledge is gained as to how the equations are set-up and then solved to find different variables in these life-applications.

The exploration of different functions is a means for analyzing and understanding a broad variety of relationships and as a useful tool for expressing generalizations.

A great deal of time is spent on the quadratic function and all the aspects of it (the graph and the function itself) and relating the quadratic function to real life (for instance area and height of a moving object with respect to time). Other functions (growth/decay, absolute value, logarithmic and rational) are introduced and the students are expected to connect the graph with the function and recognize the correlation of what is changed in the function as the graph is translated and transformed and then model the situation to solve meaningful problems.  The year ends with several weeks solving and simplifying complex and rational equations and expressions with emphasis on factoring during the process to prepare the student for Pre-Calculus or College Algebra.

Prerequisite:  Algebra I     

Credit:  1 Unit

Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward.  It is the Lord Christ you are serving.   Colossians 3:23-24


In this course, students will engage in rigorous practice that will build on their prior knowledge and skills from Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry.  The students will have a very short review of factoring and linear functions then they will work non-stop exploring all other “parent” functions.

The students are expected to recognize the name, function, graph, domain/range, zeros, and asymptotes of the functions.  They will also manipulate these functions with different translations and transformations.  The students will understand the importance of the skills required to manipulate symbols in order to solve problems and use the necessary algebraic skills required to simplify algebraic expressions and solve equations and inequalities in problem situations.  Every function is tied into real life applications such as growth/decay, compound interest, height of projectile and volume of boxes as well as many more.

Basic Trigonometry is also a part of this course for these students, and they are expected to solve triangle problems using “trig” functions or identities.

Prerequisite:  Algebra I, Algebra II, & Geometry

Credit:  1 Unit

Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward.  It is the Lord Christ you are serving.   Colossians 3:23-24

Students will become proficient in techniques of differentiation, understand the concept of rate of change and how to use it to solve real world problems, the concept of definite and indefinite integral and their relations to area and rate of change. In particular, the students will be able to explain the concept of continuous functions, compute instantaneous rate of change, compute derivatives of polynomial and transcendental functions, differentiation to solve related rate and optimization problems, and compute definite and indefinite integrals. Through all of these concepts, the students will improve and enhance their algebraic skills and be prepared more and more for college classes.

Prerequisite:  Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, & Pre-Calculous

Credit:  1 Unit

Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward.  It is the Lord Christ you are serving.   Colossians 3:23-24

This course is designed to emphasize the study of the properties and applications of common geometric figures in two and three dimensions. It includes the study of transformations and right triangle trigonometry.  Topics include basic concepts: points, lines, plains; parallel lines and polygons, perimeter and area analysis, volume and surface area analysis, similarity and congruence, and trigonometry. Content covered on the ACT/SAT will be emphasized.

Prerequisite:  Algebra I     

Credit:  1 Unit

Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward.  It is the Lord Christ you are serving.   Colossians 3:23-24

Science


Biology is an overview course intended to introduce major concepts within the biological realm that God has designed.

Students will explore the structures and functions of cells and viruses, the growth and development of organisms, the systemic organization of cells, tissues and organs, nucleic acids and genetics, taxonomy, metabolism and energy transfer in living organisms, living systems and homeostasis within the ecosystems.

Emphasis will be placed on homeostatic relationships among organisms and the epidemiology of vocabulary that transcends all disciplines.

Prerequisite:  None

Credit:  1 Unit

But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. Galatians 5:22-23


In this course, students will conduct laboratory and field investigations using the scientific method.  Emphasis will be placed on making informed decisions using critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Students will study a variety of topics that include characteristics of matter, use of the Periodic Table, development of atomic theory and chemical bonding, chemical stoichiometry, gas laws, solution chemistry and thermochemistry.

By the end of the course, students will have a clear understanding of how God’s creations involve chemistry and how it plays an integral part of daily life.

Prerequisite:  Biology, Algebra I (or currently taking)

Credit:  1 Unit

But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. Galatians 5:22-23


This course is designed to build the student’s understanding of the most basic body structures, how these structures function, dysfunction of structures, common disease, and testing and terminology.

Using a body systems approach, the course will provide the students with knowledge about basic anatomical structure as well as function and dysfunction.

Emphasis will be placed on the epidemiology of the vocabulary involved in the course and God’s homeostatic balance that must occur for all body systems to work harmoniously to achieve optimal body function.

Prerequisite:  Biology, Chemistry, Teacher approval

Credit:  1 Unit

But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. Galatians 5:22-23


In this course, students will conduct laboratory and field investigations using the scientific method.  Emphasis will be placed on making informed decisions using critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Students will study a variety of topics that include the study of motion, forces, work, power, energy, electricity, and more. They will study these fields through laboratory investigations, group-think and critical thinking.

By the end of the course, students will have a clear understanding of how God’s creations involve physics and how it plays an integral part of daily life.

Prerequisite:  Biology, Chemistry, Algebra I & II

Credit: 1 Unit

But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. Galatians 5:22-23

Social Studies


In this course, we will study the lives of significant historical people and the impact they have had on our world.  A special emphasis will be placed on the moral character of each.  Each individual studied had faults and those faults will be discussed as well, in order to show how God can use imperfect men and women to bring about His perfect will.  Also, individuals will be studied who have totally rejected God as a contrast to those who relied on God.

In World Geography, we will examine people, places, and environments at local, regional, national, and international scales from the spatial and ecological perspectives of geography.

Students will also gain an understanding of the impact of significant national and international decisions and conflicts from World War II, and the Cold War to the present of the United States.

Prerequisite:  None

Credits:  1 Unit

You are the light of the world.  A city on a hill cannot be hidden.  Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl.  Instead, they put it on a stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house.  In the same way, let your light shine before men, that they may see your good deeds and praise your Father in heaven. Matthew 5:14-16

Economics


In this course, students will master fundamental economic concepts, especially those related to personal and consumer finance, taught with a Christian worldview.  The students will learn the power of saving and investing, negotiating, responsible fiscal behavior, and the importance of avoiding debt in order to grow and maintain wealth.  The student will learn that building wealth is not a sprint but a marathon, and that the objective of wealth is not only to provide for themselves and their families but for others as well.

The student will appreciate how basic concepts of economics relate to each other and understand the structure of economic systems.  Students will use economic concepts in a reasoned, careful manner in dealing with personal, familial, community, national, and global economic issues.  They will use measurement concepts and methods such as tables, charts, graphs, ratios, percentages, etc., to understand and interpret relevant data.

They will learn to make reasoned decisions on those issues relevant to citizens, workers, business owners, managers, and heads of households.  Finally, they will appreciate that any gained knowledge in the classroom must be reinforced by disciplined behavior.

Prerequisite:  None

Credits:  0.5 Unit

You are the light of the world.  A city on a hill cannot be hidden.  Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl.  Instead they put it on a stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house.  In the same way, let your light shine before men, that they may see your good deeds and praise your Father in heaven.    Matthew 5:14-16